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Carolina Chocolate Drops & Birds Of Chicago Enervate Westhampton April 3 2014

Two great parallel groups with female lead singers/multi-instrumentalists highlighted this evening of music.  The Chocolate Drops have been around for about a decade now with CD’s produced by the likes of Buddy Miller and Joe Henry (and T-Bone Burnett will produce their next 2014 release) and awards including a Grammy for Best Traditional Folk Album 2010 ‘Genuine Negro Jig.’  Their energy is very high and the music eclectic and varied – - from Tom Waits to old-time black North Carolina fiddler Joe Thompson to traditional sources. Birds of Chicago terrific.

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Carolina Chocolate Drops & Birds Of Chicago Enervate Westhampton April 3 2014

But 1st & foremost the Carolina Chocolate Drops really are purveyors of music that comes from slavery and the banjo, which Rhiannon Giddens informs us was the primary form of music in America for about fifty years, during the latter 19th century, including black-face minstrel performances. The banjo comes from Africa, fashioned from gourds and strings – - it arrived in the Americas in the Caribbean with slavery and then migrated north.

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Hendrix New Movie Must See ‘Hear My Train Acomin’ ‘ – November 2013

Jimi Hendrix was the greatest electric guitarist EVER! You can see this in this new movie by Bob Smeaton, a Jimi Hendrix aficionado, who has apparently collected loads of footage of and about Jimi. Every moment of Jimi’s guitar playing is magic in ‘Hear My Train Acomin’,’ [which actually is a blues song about death, acomin’…] and beyond anything anyone else ever did, from the bearded boys of ZZ Top to George Harrison to Jimmy Page to Eric Clapton to Jeff Beck to Buddy Guy to Larry Coryell and Duane Allman, on and on and onward….

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’12 Years A Slave,’ ‘The Human Scale,’ ‘Tasting Menu’ Highlite Last Day of Hamptons Film Festival Oct. 14 2013

In retrospect: Best movie was ‘The Rocket,’ shot in Laos. Excellent. Great cinematography of the landscape of Laos, with superb Laotian actors. Enthralling classic movie to be seen again and again and again. 2nd best: ‘Oh Boy’ – German movie about a young man, a bit adrift in life, getting slammed in all directions as he deliberately contemplates his next step, but too often gets stepped on. Great characters, acting, humor. ‘The Human Scale’ as noted above. ‘Tasting Menu’ also noted above.

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‘The Blue Umbrella,’ ‘God Loves Uganda,’ Highlight Our Day 4 Hamptons Film Festival Oct 13 2013

We saw five shows today. ‘God Loves Uganda’ tells a terrifying story of what is happening in this post-Idi-Amin (murderous dictator) African nation invaded by evangelist missionaries, promising Ugandans that they will only have everlasting life (after they die) if they take Jesus Christ as their savior. And other movies & shorts reviewed from Hamptons Int’l Film Festival October 13 2013

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‘Mother, I Love You’ Latvia’s Oscar Entry, Makes Its East Coast Premiere At The Hamptons Film Festival Oct 12 2013

Back in the 17th century, you couldn’t go down to the corner paintstore and buy any color paint you wished to use. Vermeer had to make his own paints, and also, Jenison theorizes, his own lenses and mirrors. So to reproduce what Vermeer had to go through, Tim attempts to be Vermeer and do what he had to do.

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‘The Rocket’ Could Be Best Film in 2013 Hamptons International Film Festival Oct 2013

The 21st Hamptons International Film Festival started off with a big literal bang for my wife and me as we were lucky enough to see the wonderful movie, set in Laos of all places, entitled ‘The Rocket.’  The Laotian cast is magnificent, from Ahlo, the little boy, who is the star of the show, his beautiful mother, his grandmother (with just black stumps for teeth, who is tough as nails, spiritual, superstitious), his father, the little girl he meets and her uncle, played by Thep Phongam, into the music and aura of James Brown, who is different and accustomed to being rejected by the drones of local society.  The Laos of the story is under communist rule, and when a dammed area is to be extended to flood Ahlo’s family’s village, not much can be done but be relocated.  The survival story is that of creative adaptable people, doing what they can against severe forces of man and nature.  There is much joy and terrible tragedy.  But the hope of the movie goes to a rocket festival, the winner of which will win a large sum of money.  The panoramic landscape cinematography of this beautiful wartorn country, strewn with rockets and old bombs like the massive ‘Sleeping Tiger,’ is magnificent and frightening.  A classic fantastic movie not to be missed! It won the Audience Award for Best Narrative film this year at the Tribeca Film Festival in NYC, NY.

(Now it is Saturday Oct 19, 2013 and in retrospect, yes, ‘The Rocket’ has to be my favorite movie of the entire festival.  Good start this year, to see it as the first movie for us, this past Thursday 10 -10 – 13.  A movie so good you might want to buy it and have it around your house to watch every year or two, maybe on Independence Day July 4 in America.  Fireworks.  Rockets….)

The next movie we saw was the documentary ‘Chimeras,’ another Asian film, about two Chinese artists, shot in mostly Beijing and Shanghai.  The artists are Wang Guangyi and Liu Gang, real life artists struggling with their artistic creativity in an oppressive totalitarian China.  Guangyi is very successful, middle-aged, doing massive works, with very interesting industrial techniques, much in appreciation of communism’s struggle, honoring Mao Tse Dung, including one gigantic portrait of him, with small bars over the image of his face.  When viewing this work several times during the film, I couldn’t tell if he was behind the bars, or more likely the viewer was.  The magnificence and grandeur of scale of today’s Beijing is gigantically surprising to me.  All I had ever seen of it was smog and dark huge monolithic ugly buildings, but this is not what we see in Mika Mattila’s cinema depiction.

The huge scale of China’s capital city fits the massiveness of our planet’s largest country. The beauty and the architecture, the traffic, the tall needle structure like that of the building in Seattle, the colors, the intricacy of design is worth the price of admission to this interesting film.  During which, Wang Guangyi is not hesitant to voice his disgust for authorities, critics, always comparing his and other seminal modern Chinese art to western art, as if western art is the basis for all fine art.  We see him do this at meetings, and in discussions with other artists.  His work ‘The Other Shore’ of a valley and finely depicted trees and vegetation in light yellow, green and white, as on a slightly cloudy day, starts the movie off and finishes it, but again, behind bars, as with Mao’s face, as the movie ends.  Liu Gang is a young fortunate photographer who has garnered sudden success with his works in a ‘Paper Dreams’ theme that has travelled around the world.  He takes shots of advertisements and other images and crumples them up sometimes to uniquify them.  The portrait ends of him getting married, with very creative wedding photos being presented in his ‘paused’ career, as he now is working in a Dutch Museum in Beijing to earn money to support his three person family.  He had wanted to do a next presentation about China’s ‘One Child Policy,’ but had met much opposition to this project.  We also learn about children being murdered during the operation of this policy, and pregnant women being targeted, gangs of men attacking and kidnapping them at night.  This is an intriguing, sometimes disturbing, intellectually rewarding film by a Finnish director that I would have to give a high A+

Good quote about art, shared in this movie: “If you fail, art is suffering.  If you succeed, art is still suffering.”

 

‘Two Autumns, Three Winters,’ is a romantic French film shot in cinema verite, with the actor acting, then talking to the camera, then seamlessly continuing along in the context of the scene.  There are basically two couples in this tale, that mostly takes place in Paris.  Tragedies occur to the two male leads in separate incidents, framing the film and its romantic interludes.  Maud Wyler is the lovely Amelie, and Vincent Macaigne plays the main character, another artist, who has abandoned art and a relationship that brought him to Paris in the first place, from Bordeaux.

 

There are series of shorts, collected as themed shows, scattered throughout the festival.  Often these include the jewels of the festival, but this was not overwhelmingly true for ‘The Edge Of The World’ shorts.  Mostly bleh and not very inspiring, yet interesting enough to sit through – - what deserves the only high mention is the animated ‘Oh, Willy.”  Chunky small-eyed Willy returns to his mother on her death bed all sad and lonely.  She is living in a lovely environment, that turns out to be a nudist colony in summer with beautiful vegetation and buzzing flying insects and birds all about.  This short is delightful, and the redeeming one of ‘Edge’ – - plus it has won eighty awards internationally.

 

More later from day 2.

 

Conrad Miller M.D.   HIFF  2013  October 10

Joe Walsh Cosmic Guitar Singing WHB, NY Aug 4 2012

Joe Walsh served us some of the greatest guitar ever heard in the Hamptons last night (Aug 4 2012). Life’s Been Good, Analog Man (In A Digital World) – new album, first solo one in 20 years. Those great guitar solos, subtle, brilliant, incisive, inspiring, soaring, biting, ringing, lovely, harsh, embellishing the songs perfectly, from the mind, and nimble, still strong fingers of the master. His singing is still great, in his unique voice. No one on Earth sings like Joe Walsh!

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‘Passione’ New Movie by John Turtuffo re Napoli and its Music

‘Passione’ is a new movie by John Turtuffo, one of our great actors, who also has a great passion for Naples or Napoli in southern Italy on the Mediterranean, and its music. We see everybody singing, lots of beat up walls, some classic art and unique architecture, very expressive enactments of songs, plenty of history, people digging out of a 1944 eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, but mostly all sorts of music. And some fantastic dancing, especially one piece framed in a four story building with a central archway and a dancer per balcony, 3 to each floor. I think
all beautiful women – can’t recall any man on one of those balconies.

The title connects to the jazz song ‘Passione’ played by James Senese’s band, Mr. Senese on saxophone. He speaks about being black in Italy, and the prejudice he had to go through, as there weren’t too many black folks in Italy until after the USA invaded the land of Mussolini and overthrew the Fascists at the end of World war 2. You can see how happy a lot of Italians were to see the Americans rid them of Mussolini. Remember, they hung the mug-chinned dictator by a lightpost in the streets when the people had the opportunity to do so.

Mr. Senese explains that his father was a black soldier from North Carolina, and his mother was a Neopolitan (which means she came from Napoli or Naples).

Five men from the band Avion Travel perform in a building-framed square, then are asked who the best singer was from Napoli. Three of the five say Sergio Bruni. Then the middle person of the five sings one of his most famous songs, to the joy of the others. Then Turtuffo provides us with some footage of
the man himself on black and white film, dressed in suit and tie, with a lovely voice and a big Italian schnozzola, with a unique flute soloist interacting with Mr. Bruni on the tune provided.

Riaz, of mixed descent, does a great reggae tune, very MTV, shot in the poor streets of Napoli, with beautiful women walking
throughout the filming, including going thru this one tiny door cut out of a temporary steel wall in a building that is being renovated – which is so typical for Italy and most of Europe.

If you love music and Italy, go see this one. It’s playing one more night in Westhampton at the Performing Arts Theatre, Thursday August 11, 2011, where Wynonna Judd arrives and plays on August 13. The fantastic ‘Incendies’ will be in the Theater midweek, next week. French, terrific plot/story, but yes
quite heavy. I highly recommend that one too.